Thursday, April 27, 2017

Can We Be Born with Mental Illness?


I consider myself an expert in past lives, having done thousands of past life readings for my clients over a 20 year span of time, and having written two #1 best-seller books on the subject. Before today I'd have said resoundingly, "Absolutely not! No one is born with mental illness, sure, they can be born with a tendency to mental illness, but not already mentally ill!" Looks like I was wrong. Here is why.

"However, the degree to which these children show heightened emotion in recounting these apparent memories is a tipoff, to me, that something truly significant is going on. A boy like James Leininger shows all the hallmarks of PTSD at age two; why should he? We can get a sense for the answer by realizing how fear – that most elemental of feelings – puts our entire being on red alert. The pupils dilate, muscles are tensed, and respiration is increased as the body prepares to fight, flee, or freeze. Meanwhile, the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis springs into action by releasing a cascade of hormones that serve to marshal bodily energy. If we are indeed in mortal peril, our entire bodymind tenses like a spring ready to snap. Our senses are honed to a fine edge: we notice every detail that could affect our existence."

Author Michael Jawer
Psychology Today Magazine

More on James Leninger


Yet the ultimate unbelievable, but impossible to ignore or to dismiss, accounts are to be found in Return to Life: Extraordinary Cases of Children Who Remember Past Lives.  

The perfect example is the two-year-old "Mother" asking for help finding her children.

Image result for image of small girl asking question

This book was published in 2013 by Jim Tucker, a professor of psychiatry at the University of Virginia. He follows in the footsteps of his mentor, the late Ian Stevenson, who for decades scrupulously investigated cases in which young children around the world. These kids had spontaneously recounted, often in stunning detail, memories that clearly were, or at least seemed to be, about someone else’s life. Most of the time the person the child remembered being had died violently or unnaturally. In one such instance, a two-and-a-half-year old girl became distraught over her inability to find ‘her’ children. She tearfully and repeatedly asked for help finding them. When her parents asked questions about these children and where she last saw them, she described ‘her’ having lost her life in a road accident. She never saw them again and knew as would any mother that she needed to find them. 

Between them, Drs. Stevenson and Tucker have amassed in excess of 2,500 cases. It is amazing to read that 70% of them fit this pattern.  

Image result for image of car wreck


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